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Theme For Ernie - McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes - Reaching Fourth


1978
Label: Impulse! - YX-8551-AI • Series: インパルス・グレイト・ジャズ • Format: Vinyl LP, Album, Reissue, Stereo Gatefold • Country: Japan • Genre: Jazz • Style: Post Bop
Download Theme For Ernie - McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes - Reaching Fourth

Linna spent a decade working on this epic paper, transcribing heaps of McCoy, and filling in the blanks of how the music developed. Instead, he achieves modal sounds by making use of dominant chords and II-V progressions from other keys.

Galper also suggested to me that Tyner hung out with The Legendary Hassan. Tootie Heath remembers a day Lee Morgan came to get him at school, probably in or Although Morgan was a few years younger than Tootie, the future trumpet legend was precocious and always looking out for more local talent on the streets of Philadelphia.

Morgan walked Tootie several blocks Theme For Ernie - McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes - Reaching Fourth a beauty salon. He was allowed to practice there because his mother owned the salon. John Coltrane and McCoy Tyner began practicing together in the mids. This is true, but it also true that Coltrane got a lot from Tyner. Lacking a third, fourth chords have a mysterious stasis, refusing to commit to major or minor.

Tyner told Len Lyons that Debussy and Stravinsky were two of his favorite composers. You could even use jazz notation for the harmony: G-flat lydian and F minor Tyner also loved Bud Powell and Thelonious Monk. My playing, I believe, possessed also this metronomic rhythmic accuracy….

A profile by Ted Panken reveals another primary source:. Acquaye; Monk; Powell younger and older, Garland; the rest of jazz and European literature. There was pre-McCoy and post-McCoy, and that was all she rote. Bud Powell and Bill Evans use the conventional tonal system, so the great disciples of Powell and Evans can subsume and hide those influences reasonably quickly. Appropriating Astronomic - The Young Gods - XX Years 1985-2005 is harder.

It is a private language of sound; it is bells and drums in a pre-colonial village; it is banging stones together at the first communal fire. Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea, who share something of a quicksilver brilliance and were there chronologically and spatially in New York when all eyes were on Coltrane and Tyner, figured Tyner out enough to let some of him go.

Alice Coltrane also knew just the right amount to take from Tyner, especially from the spiritual side of the message. The musicians know, the pianists especially know, but I wonder if the world at large knows. The record label Impulse! Adding insult to injury, the jacket listed the pianist as McCoy Turner.

John S. Don DeMichael did not agree. Coltrane generated a lot of argument and introspection among Theme For Ernie - McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes - Reaching Fourth critics of the day. William Mathieu also a valuable musician has an interesting take on Live at Birdland. As the Coltrane reviews continue, Tyner is mostly ignored as a generative force. McCoy brought it all to the table.

However, not one of them describe him as an innovator or a revolutionary. Even today, Cecil Taylor can be used as way to complain about musicians who swing and play the blues.

In my view there is no reason to pit musicians against each other. Inall three pianists were operating at an extraordinary high level, all making work that would stand the test of time. But the story goes that Tyner was really down and out for a few years at the end of that decade. We talk a lot about freedom in Jazz, but there are underlying disciplines too. When you have the discipline of religion, as I have, I think you can meet the demands of music and function better.

But you have to strengthen yourself to meet those pressures. There are reasons for the pressures and problems. People will usually think of God at a time of tragedy but not when everything is running smoothly.

But most musicians believe in God, because most of them are very sensitive individuals. When I first started in music I never realized how sensitive music is, nor how sensitive we are. My mother played a little piano, and she wanted us to take an interest in music. We had the choice between singing and piano lessons, so my brother and I both took piano. When I was about 16, I had my own jazz group.

I had met another boy who had bought a set of drums, and then we added trombone, trumpet, and alto saxophone. The drummer, Garvin Masseaux, has been playing conga with Olatunji. It was hard to understand everything he was doing, but I liked it. Judging from the records he made with Max Roach and Ray Brown, I think he had reached his prime then, and I learned quite a lot from him and his brother Richard. They were profound musicians, harmonically and in many other ways.

He had worked opposite Art Come Real (Reprise) - Original Sound - What The Soul Knows and had plenty of other opportunities to hear him, and Bud had been greatly influenced by Tatum. I know he had a lot of admiration for pianists who preceded Art, too, just as I have. Tatum had really become a virtuoso. His music always sounded so neat and compact. I never thought of it as being arranged, but rather as the result of his tremendous knowledge of the instrument.

Anything he could hear he could play. After I graduated from high school, I worked days and played around home for a time. There were a lot of very good musicians in Philadelphia then and more clubs than there are now. Calvin had a nice band. Charlie Parker recorded his Fiesta. I was about 17 when I first worked with John Coltrane.

He had left Miles Davis for a period, and he was a close friend of Calvin Massey, who introduced me to him. I was working with Calvin at the Red Rooster, and John was going in there for a week.

He asked us if we wanted to work with him. After that, he would contact me whenever he came to Philly with Miles. I think he liked my playing, but we would also have long discussions on music, during which he would sometimes sit down at the piano and play.

He had a lot of ideas, and we were compatible. We saw eye to eye on so many things even at that time, and I could hear the direction he was going. Benny Golson came to Philadelphia when I was about 20, and I played a concert with him. He asked me to go to San Francisco with him, where we would pick up a bassist and a drummer.

Then the Jazztet was formed, and that was very good experience for me. It was a very musicianly band, and it had a lot of possibilities, but sometimes I felt there ought to have been more room allowed for improvisation.

Eventually there was. After about six months with the Jazztet, I got another call from John. He was forming his own group. I had a decision to make. I knew there was something with his group that I Theme For Ernie - McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes - Reaching Fourth to do, but yet the fellows in the Jazztet had been so nice TFX 1 - Hugo Westerdahl / Juan Belda - Transfixiones me, and they had helped me quite a bit, musically and otherwise, that I felt I owed something to them.

I had to be honest with them Theme For Ernie - McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes - Reaching Fourth myself, and in the end I decided the best thing to do was to go where I could be really happy, where I could contribute more and really do some good.

So I went with John. I think I made the right move. I know a lot of good groups are formed and disappear, but usually they break up because of personal differences. If the guys conducted themselves right, thought more about producing good music, and generally took care of business, then I believe they would stay together longer. Music has to be the first interest. More dollars will come later. I am proud to be part of an organization where each one is dedicated to the whole.

And I really enjoy it. People sometimes say our music is experimental, but all I can answer is that every time you sit down to play, it should be an experience. There are no barriers in our Stranger On The Shore - Acker Bilk And Strings - Stranger On The Shore section.

Everyone plays his personal concept, and nobody tells anyone else what to do. From playing together, you get to know one another so well musically that you can anticipate. We have an over-all different approach, and that is responsible for our original style.

As compared with a lot of other groups, we feel differently about music. We definitely believe in the value of the spontaneous. So far as we are concerned, too, a lot depends on what John does. A rhythm section is supposed to support and inspire the soloist, and it is a very sensitive thing. How each one of us feels can determine so much, but when I come to solo I may be inspired by what John has played and by the support Elvin Jones and Jimmy Garrison are giving me.

Something important is involved here, I think. The pianist tends to play chords that the soloist knows are coming up next anyway.


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  2. This set combines two of pianist McCoy Tyner's early-'60s LPs for Impulse! Records, ’s Inception, which finds Tyner as part of a trio with bassist Art Davis and drummer Elvin Jones, and ’s Reaching Fourth, which features him in another trio, this time with bassist Henry Grimes and drummer Roy Haynes.
  3. Jun 12,  · McCoy Tyner Trio - Reaching Fourth McCoy Tyner - piano Henry Grimes - bass Roy Haynes - drums Posted by The Thought Criminal at PM. No comments: Post a Comment. Newer Post Older Post Home. Subscribe to: Post Comments (Atom) Simple theme. Powered by Blogger.
  4. McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes - Reaching Fourth ‎ (LP, Album, Mono, Promo, Gat) Impulse!/5(2).
  5. This release contains McCoy Tyner’s first two albums as a leader, Inception (Impulse AS) and Reaching Fourth (Impulse AS) in their entirety. Both LPs present the pianist in a trio format backed by such expert musicians as bassists Art Davis and Henry Grimes, and drummers Elvin Jones and Roy Haynes.
  6. McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes - Reaching Fourth ‎ (LP, Album, Mono, Promo, Gat) Impulse!/5(8).
  7. Reaching Fourth is the second album by jazz pianist McCoy Tyner which was released on the Impulse! label in It features performances by Tyner with Henry Grimes and Roy Haynes.
  8. Reaching Fourth, an Album by McCoy Tyner Trio. Released in February on Impulse! (catalog no. A; Vinyl LP). Genres: Jazz. Featured peformers: McCoy Tyner (piano), Henry Grimes (bass), Roy Haynes (drums), Bob Thiele (producer), Rudy Van Gelder (engineer), Robert Flynn (cover design), Joe Lebow (design), Bob Ghiraldini (photography), Dan Morgenstern (liner notes).
  9. Discover releases, reviews, track listings, recommendations, and more about McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes - Reaching Fourth at Discogs. Complete your McCoy Tyner Trio With Roy Haynes And Henry Grimes collection/5(50).
  10. Reaching Fourth is the second album by jazz pianist McCoy Tyner which was released on the Impulse! label in It features performances by Tyner with Henry Grimes and Roy Haynes. ContentsGenre: Jazz.

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